6 WHISKY FACTS YOU CAN IMPRESS YOUR FRIENDS WITH

 

1. Whisky is an English word derived from the Gaelic term "uisge beatha" or "usquebaugh" which means "water of life".

2. Know your malts: Pure Malt is from various distilleries, blended together. Single Malt comes from a single distillery but is blended from several casks. Single Cask comes from a single distillery, and only one cask.

3. Whilst a whisky improves in the barrel, it does not improve further in the bottle.

4. The age of a whisky is determined by the youngest ingredient of the blend.

5. The natural colour of a malt is very pale. Caramel is added to enrich the colour (except for American whiskeys).

6. Whisky or whiskey? Although still up for debate, legend has it that during the 1800s, Irish and American distillers starting adding an “e” to the word whisky in order to differentiate themselves from the famous Scotch whisky. The tradition has continued today, with “whiskey” denoting Irish or American provenance, and “whisky” referring to distilleries in Scotland, Japan and Canada.

6 WHISKY FACTS YOU CAN IMPRESS YOUR FRIENDS WITH

 

1. Whisky is an English word derived from the Gaelic term "uisge beatha" or "usquebaugh" which means "water of life".

2. Know your malts: Pure Malt is from various distilleries, blended together. Single Malt comes from a single distillery but is blended from several casks. Single Cask comes from a single distillery, and only one cask.

3. Whilst a whisky improves in the barrel, it does not improve further in the bottle.

4. The age of a whisky is determined by the youngest ingredient of the blend.

5. The natural colour of a malt is very pale. Caramel is added to enrich the colour (except for American whiskeys).

6. Whisky or whiskey? Although still up for debate, legend has it that during the 1800s, Irish and American distillers starting adding an “e” to the word whisky in order to differentiate themselves from the famous Scotch whisky. The tradition has continued today, with “whiskey” denoting Irish or American provenance, and “whisky” referring to distilleries in Scotland, Japan and Canada.